Ladies and Gents, Here's SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Rocket!

Khryss | Published 2017-12-29 19:50

On December 20, 2017, Hat Salesman Elon Musk posted three pictures on Twitter with the caption "Falcon Heavy at the Cape". For non-space nerds, the pictures shown are SpaceX's Falcon heavy rocket being prepped for launch coming January 2018. It was taken at Cape Canaveral in Florida and will launch in the launch pad that took the Apollo astronauts to the moon via the Saturn V Rocket.

The Falcon Heavy rocket consists of three Falcon 9 rockets strapped together, which makes it the most powerful rocket currently in use, but the Saturn V still powerful than the Falcon Heavy, with twice the thrust. Its powerful thrust means that the rocket could be used to launch heavier satellites into orbit and could do deep space missions. Musk also plans to use the rocket to launch two space tourists around the Moon.  Musk also said that that the max thrust at lift off is 5.1 million pounds or 2,300 metric tons.

The current payload? Musk's own midnight cherry Tesla Roadster. The SpaceX founder and CEO repeatedly said that the first launch of the rocket has a good chance of failing, that's why Musk puts a "joke" payload on it. If all goes smoothly, SpaceX then attempts to land all of the boosters of the rocket, one on a drone ship and two on Cape Canaveral. Also, if the launch is successful, the Tesla Roadster will be sent to the orbit of Mars, leave there in the abyss of space.

This tweet neatly wraps up SpaceX's actiivity for 2017. Having launched twice as many rockets as in 2016, the company also launched its 13th cargo mission to the International Space Station for NASA. The company also performed multiple landings.

But the real exciting part is when the Falcon Heavy launches in January, if it won't be delayed (but there's a good chance that it will be). But when it does launch, be sure to find time to watch this historic event.

http://www.iflscience.com/space/elon-musk-just-gave-us-a-glimpse-of-spacexs-falcon-heavy-rocket/

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