This Incredible Tunnel Could be The Future of Fast Travel!

Khryss | Published 2017-02-26 06:31
Remember those extremely fast capitol trains in the movie Hunger Games? Well, the 250 miles per hour average speed might be far-fetched but at least, we now have something to look forward to- we are starting to create new ways to achieve such. Researchers at Notre Dame are trying to develop wind tunnels that can travel cross-country in a matter of minutes! This is expected to move at six times the speed of sound, soon changing travels like no other. “We're making things that are impossible right now, possible," said Thomas Juliano, head of the project and a professor with Notre Dame’s aerospace and mechanical engineering department. If this goes as planned, Notre Dame is soon going to be the home of the biggest hypersonic wind tunnel in the country. This unique project specifically takes place in a field in St. Joseph Road near Notre Dame. "This wind tunnel is going to be a unique facility – not just at any university, not just anywhere in the United States, but anywhere in the world," Juliano told WSBT 22. Their goal is to figure out how to travel from D.C. to L.A. in less than 15 minutes. "We've accomplished so much with all of our planes and jet engines that a lot of people are looking at how to make everything more efficient, fly further and fly faster. We are working on the faster,” grad student and researcher Alec Houpt said. Although it seemed quite impossible, Juliano said that this type of travel is not too far in the future. “I think the technical feasibility, maybe 30 or 40 years," he said. This project has also gotten about $1.3 million in funding from the Air Force, and over half a million from Notre Dame. Who knows, right? With its speed, this exciting new means of traveling can probably fly from Chicago to Tokyo in just two and a half hours! I guess time is really gold for these individuals. http://wsbt.com/news/local/cross-country-travel-in-minutes-notre-dames-unique-wind-tunnel-may-be-key
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