This Revolutionary Treatment Uses Fish Skin to Treat Burns!

Admin | Published 2016-12-16 14:22

A woman suffering from severe burns has been the first to be given this new treatment using fish skin to heal burn wounds.

Maria Ines Candido da Silva, 36, worked as a waitress at a restaurant when a canister explosion left her with severe burns to her arms, neck and some of her face. Instead of the usual hydrocolloid or alginate dressing, the skin of Tilapia fish was instead used on da Silva's wounds as an alternative treatment.

Maria Ines Candido da Silva, burn treatment (Photo Caters News Agency)

The fish skin preparation underwent a rigorous process to ensure that they are free from toxins and transmitted diseases. The muscle tissues and scales are also removed. Once cleaned, the material is stretched to 10cm by 20cm and then laminated. The fish skins are then stored in a refrigerated facility in Sao Paolo, Brazil up to two years. Doctors find the result of the tilapia skin as something similar to human. One may look like a merman sporting the natural bandage, but its flexibility to be wrapped around the wound without problems make it an effortless method to work on.

Applied tilapia fish skin treatment to da Silva's burns.

Da Silva got to sport the treatment dressing for 11 days before being removed and replenished over a 20 day period to repair the damaged tissue. Dr Edmar Maciel, one of the plastic surgeons who developed the treatment explained the important features of the tilapia fish skins as a treatment for burn wounds. He said that the fish skin has 'optimum levels of collagen type one.' He adds, "We discovered that Tilapia fish skin performs significantly better in the healing process by soothing and curing severe wounds caused by burns." Da Silva herself only has good words for the treatment. She said, "I loved the treatment and would recommend it to anyone who has suffered like me." It's remarkable how nature has consistently amazed us with its wonders. See: A Gun That Heals: Regain Burnt Skin Scar-Free, Faster! Source: dailymail.co.uk
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