Car Hacking Will Be a Public Safety Issue

Admin | Published 2016-07-27 12:08
Automobiles are starting to represent robotic smartphones on wheels. That means the cars are pretty juicy targets for "hackers". So far there have been relatively few incidents of car hacking beyond demonstrations by security researchers. However, GM CEO Mary Barra said that car security would become a significant public safety issue in the years to come. “A cyber incident is not a problem just for the automaker involved,” Barra said at an industry conference held in Detroit. “It is a problem for every automaker around the world. It is a matter of public safety.”

Mary Barra, CEO

Following such episodes, carmakers have begun stepping up efforts to design vehicles to be more secure, but some experts warn that more needs to be done. In her speech, Barra also hinted at some of the threats car owners might soon face as hackers turn their attention from smartphones and laptops to vehicles. “The threat landscape is continually evolving, and sophisticated attacks are specifically designed to circumvent even the most robust defense systems,” she said. “Whether it is phishing or spyware, malware or ransomware, the attacks are getting more and more sophisticated every day.” The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, an association of 12 carmakers including GM, Ford, BMW, Volkswagen, and Toyota, and the Association of Global Automakers, an industry trade association, this week released a set of best practices on automotive security. These include recommendations to share information about vulnerabilities and to design systems with security as a priority. Under Barra, GM has taken a more aggressive approach to technology, developing vehicle-to-vehicle communications and automated driving systems. The company recently bought Cruise, a company developing after-market automated driving systems, and has invested in the ride-hailing company Lyft. GM pioneered the use of connectivity with OnStar, a subsidiary that provides hands-free calling, navigation services, and diagnostics through a dedicated cellular link. Other carmakers, such as Tesla, have taken the idea much further, though, allowing a vehicle to be upgraded or reconfigured over the air. source - https://www.technologyreview.com
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